G5A Foundation Lecture Series: Ravi agarwal

G5A Foundation | August 10, 2021

Ravi Agarwal has an interdisciplinary practice as an artist, photographer, environmental campaigner, writer, curator. His work explores key contemporary questions of ecology, society, urban space and capital. Photography has been a prime medium for him for over four decades, which has expanded over time to include video, public art, installations, and recently also printmaking.

Ravi agarwal: profile by Photo South asia

Photo South Asia

Profile of Ravi Agarwal by Photo South Asia.

Restart Podcast Ep. 43: A life in art, activism and electronic waste with Ravi Agarwal

Restart Radio | 27 June 2019

Ravi Agarwal is a multifaceted artist and activist based in New Delhi. We hear Ravi’s reflections on his life between disciplines, and we learn about the work of his NGO, Toxics Link. We talk about the toxicity of e-waste and the threats it poses to people working in recycling sites.

Indian artist Ravi Agarwal on show at PAV Turin

Vincenzo Estremo, Droste Effect Magazine | April 8, 2019

Taking pictures of something in order to keep it in mind is a common practice, that is functional on the one hand, but on the other it empties photography of its past. Ravi Agarwal‘s latest exhibition at PAV – Parco Arte Vivente in Turin (Italy), curated by Marco Scotini, is a journey of rediscovering the embedded report of photography’s political function.

RAVI AGARWAL. ECOLOGIES OF LOSS

Arte.It – The Map of Art in Italy | 08 March 2019

On Friday 8th March 2019, PAV Parco Arte Vivente will present Ecologies of Loss, the first Italian solo exhibition of the Indian artist Ravi Agarwal. Curated by Marco Scotini, this exhibition continues his investigation into the relationship between artistic practices and ecological thought in the Asian continent, begun with the solo exhibition of the Chinese artist Zheng Bo Weed Party III. This investigation (around which there will soon be other events), wants to take stock of the “centrality of Asia in the climate crisis” as claimed by Amitav Ghosh. 

Ravi Agarwal - Ecologies of Loss

e-Flux | February 14, 2019

PAV Parco Arte Vivente presents Ecologies of Loss, the first Italian solo exhibition of the Indian artist Ravi Agarwal. Curated by Marco Scotini, this exhibition continues the investigation into the relationship between artistic practices and ecological thought in the Asian context, begun with the solo exhibition of the Chinese artist Zheng Bo. This research wants to take stock of the “centrality of Asia in the climate crisis” as claimed by Amitav Ghosh.

India Art Fair 2019: On the edge, provocative and at times even revolutionary

Jaideep Sen, Indian Express | February 01, 2019

THE heightened sense of anticipation at the India Art Fair 2019 cuts like a knife through the clouds of winter smog hanging low over the NSIC Grounds of the capital. The shows of note at the festival are many, by a number of acclaimed artists from India and overseas, but a few names have everybody’s attention piqued like icicles in a snow storm.

Reconstituting the Other: the State of Nature

Renuka Sawhney

Ravi Agarwal’s work takes the forms of photographs, videos, installation, research and writing on pressingenvironmental concerns and activism. In Else, all will be Still, Agarwal integrates these varied forms into complexenunciations of his engagement with specific bodies of knowledge; Agarwal tackles the epistemologies of natureand ecology placing them in a dance with the social contract through the ontology of its objects.

Installation art makes presence felt at India Art Fair

Siddhi Jain, The Quint | February 09, 2019

Another work by Ravi Agarwal called “The Desert of the Anthropocene” is an installation with photographic works, text, videos and objects, and is a part of an ongoing investigation into the current state of the nature — both as a crisis which traverses a political realm, but also a cultural contestation of how ‘nature’ is thought of as an abstract idea to be exploited, in the era of the Anthropocene.

It’s in their nature: Artists hold event for environment

Heena Khandelwal, DNA

Can artists succeed where activists have failed? Environmentalists and animals rights activists have not got very far with opposing development projects such as the Ken-Betwa river-linking project which threaten to damage ecologically-sensitive areas, but a unique theatre project held in the capital this weekend tried to see whether art could work any better.    

This was a  staged‘mock trial’ named ‘Landscape as Evidence: Artist as Witness’ with participation by ‘real’lawyers – Norma Alvares and Anand Grover – and a ‘real’, albeit retired, judge – Justice Yatindra Singh, the former Chief Justice of Chattisgarh High Court. The  ‘witnesses’ were artists Navjot Altaf, Ravi Agarwal and Sheba Chhachhi who presented ‘evidence’in the form of artworks which were examined and cross-examined by the lawyers . 

ECOLOGIES OF LOSS – Ravi Agarwal – PAV Parco Arte Vivente – Torino

Melograno Art Gallery | 9 March, 2019

Venerdì 8 Marzo 2019, il PAV Parco Arte Vivente presenta Ecologies of Loss, la prima personale italiana dell’artista indiano Ravi Agarwal. Con questa mostra, a cura di Marco Scotini, prosegue l’indagine del rapporto tra pratiche artistiche e pensiero ecologista nel continente asiatico, inaugurata con la personale dell’artista cinese Zheng Bo Weed Party III. L’indagine (che vedrà presto altri appuntamenti) cerca di fare il punto sulla “centralità dell’Asia nella crisi climatica”, come sostiene Amitav Ghosh.

Tra i maggiori esponenti della scena artistica indiana, da decenni Ravi Agarwal conduce una pratica inter-disciplinare come artista, fotografo, attivista ambientale, scrittore e curatore. Il suo lavoro esplora questioni nodali dell’epoca contemporanea quali l’ecologia, la società, lo spazio urbano e rurale, il capitale. Per oltre quattro decadi, la fotografia ha costituito il medium d’elezione per il lavoro di Ravi Agarwal, che ha poi conosciuto una dimensione più estesa grazie all’inclusione di installazioni, video, interventi di arte pubblica, diari, all’interno di progetti dalla durata pluriennale.

Embrace our Rivers- Public Art and Ecology in India

Prakash Goldpearl, Chennayil | January 8, 2019

Art and its ideas have a special role to play in shaping our consciousness. Urban spaces, particularly those in rapidly expanding cities in new developing economies are in direct conflict with nature, as rivers, wetlands, green areas, are being changed to suit urbanization’s short term goals. To help re-think urban space as democratic and in coexistence with nature, Embrace our Rivers was proposed as a public art project in the coastal megacity of Chennai, India. It was to be held on the estuary of the very polluted river Cooum, where the highly polluted river meets the beautiful, wide Bay of Bengal at the Marina Beach, one of the longest beaches in any city.

Personal spaces seep into photographic practices at Goa art exhibition

The New Indian Express | December 16, 2018

Curated by photographer-curator and environmental campaigner Ravi Agarwal, the show titled “Intimate Documents” looks at the photograph as a document that turns more contemporary as it showcases more of the photographer’s personal space.implementation and impact of industrial methods.

At Kochi biennale, Sangam poems throw light on nature

M T Saju, Times of India | February 15, 2017

Four years ago, when Ravi Agarwal decided to explain the unending possibilities of nature through his work, this artist-photographer searched for some ancient literary texts related to nature and landscape. A few months of searching led him to a copy of “Poems of love and war”, a collection of eight anthologies and the ten long poems of Sangam era. After reading the book, Agarwal didn’t look back. There were no other ancient poems, according to him, which could capture the relationship with nature so vibrantly as the Sangam poems.

INTERVIEW: Ravi Agarwal, Photography Curator, Serendipity Arts Festival 2019

Joe Burrows, London Photography Diary |
December 15, 2019

Serendipity Arts Festival (SAF), is a leading multidisciplinary art event and is one of the largest in South Asia. Curating a wide variety of works, with performing arts, film and literature, and photography to name a few, SAF offers a comprehensive insight into contemporary Indian art. In the run-up to SAF’s fourth edition, London Photography Diary spoke with Ravi Agarwal, Photography Curator for 2019.

With the death of Okwui Enwezor, Indian art has lost a sympathetic eye

Gayatri Sinha, The Hindu | March 22, 2019

With regard to India, Enwezor in a sense catapulted three artists to the world stage with documenta 11: Raqs Media Collective, Ravi Agarwal and Amar Kanwar, all media practitioners who gained a platform for an engagement with social issues. What he had succeeded in doing with mapping African photography had an echo closer home.

RAVI AGARWAL: ECOLOGIES OF LOSS

REDAZIONE DIGICULT | March 3, 2019

PAV Parco Arte Vivente presents Ecologies of Loss, the first Italian solo exhibition of the Indian artist Ravi Agarwal. Curated by Marco Scotini, this exhibition continues the investigation into the relationship between artistic practices and ecological thought in the Asian context, begun with the solo exhibition of the Chinese artist Zheng Bo. This research wants to take stock of the “centrality of Asia in the climate crisis” as claimed by Amitav Ghosh.

Edinburgh Art Festival features of leading international and UK artists

The List | 2 August 2018

At Edinburgh Printmakers, Indian artist Ravi Agarwal has his first solo UK show Nàdar / Prakriti, which is inspired by a research residency undertaken by the artist in the Scottish Highlands. Agarwal is interested in the pressures and challenges posed to nature in Scotland, a nation whose landscape looks an awful lot less unformed by human intervention than it actually is.

Changing the way waste is treated

Sanghmitra Jethwani, DNA | February 14, 2018

A discussion among artists, activists and researchers sought to find a solution for the garbage crisis

Ravi Agarwal — This monster needs to be fed!

DAS MÜLLPROJEKT | June 17, 2017

Waste has been accepted as an outcome of the material economy. It is produced throughout the extraction, production and consumption process. It is however in reality a waste of resources or ‘nature.’ At best we seem to be concerned with disposing waste, owing to health, hygiene and aesthetic considerations. So long as it ‘disappears’ without a ‘trace,’ we are comfortable with it. In fact till a few decades back, waste was not even considered to be a problem, and was dumped everywhere. Often the disposal of waste causes series challenges of containing toxicity in the form of emissions or effluents, which are partially overcome by employing high tech solutions which are extremely expensive, and even then inadequate.

Politics of a Planetary Future: An Interview with Ravi Agarwal

Caroline Picard, Bad at Sports | August 09, 2016

Based out of New Delhi, artist, curator, writer and activist, Ravi Agarwal works to unearth the complexity of humanity’s ecological and economic imagination, drawing connections between Europe and India, while comparing the implementation and impact of industrial methods.

Ravi Agarwal: In the Realm of Nature

Shreya Ray, Open Magazine | 10 May, 2016

Ravi Agarwal’s photography forces us to ask: Is this what we do to nature? Is this what we do in turn, to ourselves?

“Else, all will be still”: Delhi photographer Ravi Agarwal at Gallery Espace

Art Radar | April 11, 2016

Ravi Agarwal’s body of work is a keen and sustained contemplation on questions of ecological sustainability, urban developmental practices, capital and the human conditions of those who share an intimate relationship with the nature around them. His latest solo exhibition “Else, all will be still”, running at Gallery Espace in Delhi from 8 April to 14 May 2016, is a further excavation of his preoccupation with these issues, particularly man’s relationship to nature.

Besides photography, Delhi-based Agarwal also works with video, performance, public art, in situ installations and found objects. He is a writer, curator and an environmental activist who has written extensively on ecological issues and is Founder-Director of the NGO Toxic Link.

92 INDIAN ART SHOWS THAT IMPACTED 2015

Wyanet Vaz, Verve Magazine | December 31, 2015

Verve documents all the canvases that made it to our art wall in 2015.

EXPLORE ECOLOGY WITH RAVI AGARWAL’S ART

Huzan Tata, Verve Magazine | November 22, 2015

Agarwal’s artworks focus on the ecosystem, and our ever-changing land, trying to find answers along the way, through a series of photographs, videos and installations. ‘Urgency is in the air. Else, all will be still,’ as the artist says.

Looking In/Looking Out: Contemporary Indian Photography from the Guar Collection

Massachusetts College of Art and Design | September 28, 2015

Project Y (Public. Art. Outreach) was a project held on the banks of the River Yamuna in Delhi. The event was part of a twin city Yamuna-Elbe Project1 which took place in Hamburg and Delhi in October and November 2011. The curatorial ideas to guide Project Y were to re-imagine and change the dominant narrative of the river as being ‘dirty’ to it being ‘beautiful’, and to ‘reproduce’ it as an ecological public space accessible to all. It was also a proposal for an ecologically sustainable Delhi, which is currently facing severe stress. Questions like ‘should rivers just be left alone and allowed to flow unfettered, irrespective of their utility’, or ‘how should we think of rivers, ecosystems, technology and urban spaces’ or ‘what happens when we replace economy with ecology’, and ‘does development answers the question of ecology’, were inscribed within.

Re-imaging the river

India Seminar | 2014

 

Project Y (Public. Art. Outreach) was a project held on the banks of the River Yamuna in Delhi. The event was part of a twin city Yamuna-Elbe Project1 which took place in Hamburg and Delhi in October and November 2011. The curatorial ideas to guide Project Y were to re-imagine and change the dominant narrative of the river as being ‘dirty’ to it being ‘beautiful’, and to ‘reproduce’ it as an ecological public space accessible to all. It was also a proposal for an ecologically sustainable Delhi, which is currently facing severe stress. Questions like ‘should rivers just be left alone and allowed to flow unfettered, irrespective of their utility’, or ‘how should we think of rivers, ecosystems, technology and urban spaces’ or ‘what happens when we replace economy with ecology’, and ‘does development answers the question of ecology’, were inscribed within.

Down and Out, labouring under globalization

Camilla Boemio, Landscape Stories | June 2012

Interview curated by Camilla Boemio

Indian Highway – Contemporary Indian Video Art

Reykjavík Art Museum | September 9, 2010

The overall theme of the exhibition, Indian Highway, involves reflections on the importance of the road in migration and movement and as the link between rural and urban communities. The title also makes reference to technology and the ‘information superhighway’, which has been central to India’s economic boom. A common thread throughout is the way in which these artists demonstrate an active political and social engagement, examining complex issues in contemporary India that include environmentalism, religious sectarianism, globalization, gender, sexuality and class.

Art, Ecology, Politics: A Roundtable

Centre for the Study of Developing Societies | February 1, 2013

This roundtable brings some of the contributors from the Third Text issue as well as other speakers to open up the larger question of eco-aesthetics in the postcolonial world.

Interview with Ravi Agarwal on 'Imagined Documents' and Serendipity Arts Festival

The Art Issue |  2019

Ravi Agarwal has an inter-disciplinary practice as an artist, photographer, writer and curator. His work explores key contemporary questions around ecology, society, urban space and capital. He works with photographs, video, installations, and public art and has been shown widely in shows, including at the Kochi Biennial (2016), Sharjah Biennial (2013) and Documenta XI (2002).

Ravi Agarwal is the curator for Photography at Serendipity Arts Festival 2019.

Curating Photography: Ravi Agarwal

Shalmali Shetty, Art Dose | 8th January 2019

Using photography to document the every day is becoming a fundamental gesture. Making notes, recording textual pieces of evidence and capturing visual experiences is being realised today with the basic use of the camera. Fulfilling both social and personal intentions, this contextualised and documented information becomes a visual reference that survives for a later date.

Curator Ravi Agarwal brought together seven photographers for his curatorial intervention at the Serendipity Arts Festival’s 2018 edition, showcased at the Adil Shah Palace. Titled ‘Intimate Documents’, Ravi Agarwal was interested in making a proposal to observe the direction contemporary photography is taking, and to get one to think about what is happening in photography today, over other forms of curatorial intent.

Chennai’s complicated relationship with its dying rivers, as chronicled by artists

Vinita Govindarajan, Scroll.in | February 20, 2018

Nayar’s project is one of the 13 installations presented at DAMned Art Project, an exhibition organised by the Goethe Institute of Chennai, which runs until March 4. The exhibition displays ideas and simulations of public art based on Chennai’s polluted rivers, curated by artists Ravi Agarwal and Florian Matzner. Over 20 artists from India and Europe visited the city and walked along its chemical-ridden waters, meeting local communities who lived on its banks, to come up with an idea for a piece of public art, depicting their individual interpretations of what the rivers mean to the city.

Emplacing and Excavating the City: Art, Ecology, and Public Space in New Delhi

Christiane Brosius, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg |  August 03, 2015

An interesting case study for the exploration of how government institutions today regulate space and thus to some extent the imaginaries of national identity, is Ravi Agarwal’s work Extinct. Over the past ten years the artist, originally from New Delhi, has made the interesting transition from environmental activist and documentary photographer to artist and, of late, curator. He has worked with art installations that address issues such as declining industries and labour conditions in the context of high capitalism as well as pollution and farming, often with a focus on the river Yamuna. His own work has been exhibited abroad, for instance at documenta 11 (2002), curated by Okwui Enwezor, or in the travelling exhibition Indian Highway (Bublatzky 2011). Agarwal’s work for 48°C was research based and dealt with Delhi’s last three remaining vultures—stuffed and preserved in a diorama in the Natural History Museum near Connaught Place.

Yamuna - Elbe public art project

Asia-Europe Foundation | October 16, 2011

Project Y: a Yamuna-Elbe Public Art and Outreach Project is initiated by the Ministry of Culture, Hamburg, and carried out in the framework of “Germany and India 2011-2012: Infinite Opportunities”. It is held in the cities of Delhi and Hamburg between October 16th and November 23rd, 2011, almost in parallel.

10th Edition India Art Fair 2018

Feministaa | February 22, 2018

India Art Fair, the leading platform for contemporary and modern art from South Asia, closed its tenth edition on 12 February 2018, amidst positive commentary from galleries, artists, museum professionals, and collectors. For the first time under the leadership of Fair Director Jagdip Jagpal, the 2018 India Art Fair set the tone for the future development of the fair’s offer, creating anticipation and confidence for future editions.

In every sense: Groundbreaking projects at Serendipity Arts Festival 2018

The New Indian Express | January 11, 2019

While Goa did provide adequate room for the festival’s monumental spread of events, the clinching factor was easily in the hosts’ choice of curators — an epic assembly in itself, of eminent artists and figures including Rahaab Allana and Ravi Agarwal (photography), Ranjit Hoskote and Subodh Gupta (visual arts), Rahul Akerkar and Odette Mascarenhas (culinary arts), Leela Samson and Ranjana Dave (dance), Atul Kumar and Arundhati Nag (theatre), Aneesh Pradhan and Sneha Khanwalkar (music), as well as Annapurna Garimella and Rashmi Verma (craft).

In addition, a host of collateral projects were led by Shubha Mudgal, Ayush Kasliwal, Hanif Qureishi, Meenakshi Thirukode and Sabeena Gadihoke, among others.

From Tamil to Torrin, comparative natural histories

Kevin Lelland, John Muir Trust

November 14, 2017

Kevin Lelland, the Trust’s Head of Communications and Membership, catches up with a renowned Indian artist and environmental campaigner.

FREIE FLUSSZONE SÜDERELBE: Hypothetische Schließung für die Binnenschifffahr

Kunst Aspekte | August 1, 2017

Landschaft ist Zwecken untergeordneter Raum – so könnte man vielleicht sagen. Es sind weniger die individuellen Formungs- und Planungsabsichten, sondern kollektive, weitgehend der Ökonomie verpflichtete und nahezu allgegenwärtig durchgesetzte Zwecksetzungen, die Landschaft ihre Gestalt verleihen.

Mock trial explores artists' role in preserving environment

DNA | April 9, 2017

He charts out the ill effects point by point, presenting a video as an evidence, as Norma Alvares, a Bombay High Court advocate representing Agarwal, requests that the commission of enquiry should look into the river linking project in question.

Indian art, artists and their connect with the environment

The New Indian Express | January 10, 2017

Through the process of revisiting, mapping, building and understanding old properties, she tried to draw the crowd’s attention to the spaces that were once lost in time.

Ecological Contestations: Ravi Agarwal in Conversation with Ranjit Hoskote

Mohile Parikh Center | October 27, 2015

In this discussion, Ravi Agarwal and Ranjit Hoskote will converse on ideas of art, ecology and sustainability, linking them to the Agarwal’s art practice and environmental activism. The program is organized in conjunction with the artist’s ongoing exhibition, Else all will be still, at The Guild, Alibaug.

55th Venice Biennale: INTERVIEW WITH RAVI AGARWAL

Camilla Boemio, Maldives Pavilion | June 4, 2013

In this discussion, Ravi Agarwal and Ranjit Hoskote will converse on ideas of art, ecology and sustainability, linking them to the Agarwal’s art practice and environmental activism. The program is organized in conjunction with the artist’s ongoing exhibition, Else all will be still, at The Guild, Alibaug.

Generation in Transition. New Art from India

Contemporary Art Centre, Lithuania | 
December 09, 2011

The exhibition entitled Generation in Transition presents the artworks of a young generation of artists of Indian origin, living and working in India, as well as in America and Europe.

It is the first extensive showcase of contemporary art from this region presented in Lithuania. For about twenty years now, India has been experiencing an enormous economic and technological development, which has had a substantial impact on social structures. This change, with its positive and negative aspects, is frequently reflected in the works of contemporary artists, especially in those of the youngest ones who have grown up in these interesting times of transition.

MIA (Minneapolis Institute of Art) exhibit showcases modern art from India

Marianne Combs, Minnesota Public Radio |
October 24, 2008

The MIA has quite a few objects from India in its permanent collection, primarily sandstone carvings, watercolors and jewelry, all centuries old. Curator Bob Jacobsen says the exhibition opening this weekend offers Minnesotans a more contemporary perspective on some universal themes.